Door-opening Sentences

Upon reading the title and the opening sentence of an article, I decide whether to continue reading… when writing articles, I consider the title and first sentence as an open door inviting a reader to step into the topic. Open doors present choices, and readers can choose to enter into the topic, or move on to the next door.

On the last day of 2018, I present six open doors… articles written this past year for Rhode Island’s Natural Awakenings magazine. The magazine tagline is “healthy living healthy planet.” Each article spotlights innovative Rhode Islanders doing amazing stuff to help make this world a better place for others. I’m passionate about interviewing cool people and sharing their inspiring stories. Which door below beckons you to enter?

Meditation in Rhode Island (Feb 2018) – While meditation practice is known to help promote greater concentration, mindfulness and relaxation, it is also shown to help decrease anxiety and depression. Read more.

Regenerating Soil Naturally (Jul 2018)Vermicomposting is the process of using worms and micro-organisms to turn food waste into nutrient-rich humus. Read more.

Plastic Waste Reduction Heroes: Reduce, Reuse and Repurpose (Sep 2018) – Produced from fossil fuel, plastics and plastic waste are directly associated with climate change, and as more people realize this, more people take action. Read more.

Young Voices for Education Equity (Oct 2018) – At Young Voices, a Rhode Island organization that provides low-income youth with advocacy skills, students are helped in understanding an issue, thinking strategically, speaking out articulately and persuasively, and assuming roles of leadership. Read more.

FreshConn: An Online Farmer’s Market with a Social Responsibility (Nov 2018) – When Patrick Straus and Brandon Monti look at problems, they see solutions. Co-founders of FreshConn, Straus and Monti represent the emerging generation of spirit-inspired social entrepreneurs. Read more.

Adventurer Vincent Brown: Owner of 2nd Wind Health Premium Yoga Mats (Dec 2018)What got you into yoga and the yoga mat business? I broke my arm snowboarding. Read more.


The Devil in the Detail

In preparation for Neil’s return home from the hospital, we had rented a hospital bed and positioned it to face a freshly-cut Christmas tree. We had to establish new home routines, since Neil was now bedridden. We had converted the rest of the dining room into a private hospital ward. We stocked the dining room shelves with towels and hospital supplies and stowed bulkier items under the bed – a carton of feeding formula, disposable bed pads, a package of Depends and a giant bag of mouth swabs.

Dr. B. had given us a plan for gradually resuming Neil’s therapy infusions, and there was a tangle of tubes and bags to organize and manage. Dean set up a pole behind the bed for hanging ANP bags and the Liquid Hope feeding formula bag, along with their associated tubing and pumps. Liquid Hope is not a product provided by hospitals. It is a special formula made with real whole food ingredients. Unlike standard hospital formula, it is a plant-based organic product, that is corn-free, soy-free and GMO-free. Before ordering it from the manufacturer ourselves, we had to demonstrate to the hospital nutritionist that it was nutritionally complete and met their dietary guidelines.

Syringes, spring water, a suction pump and hand sanitizer sat on the table next to Neil’s bed. In between ANP cycles and Liquid Hope meals, we used a syringe to provide Neil with water through the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), a flexible feeding tube that had been surgically placed into Neil’s stomach before we left the hospital. We ground up his pills and dissolved them in small amounts of water, which we pulled into the syringe, measuring and delivering the fluids through the PEG. We used the suction device, with its tube and attachments, to keep Neil’s throat clear of phlegm. It was a noisy machine, yet it worked as needed. Dean handled suctioning during the day. Evie and I took turns during the night, while sleeping vigil on a living room couch.

Maintaining the proper amount of water was a challenging trial and error process. Since Neil was no longer able to self-regulate his water intake, we had to try our best to regulate it for him. In mid-December Neil was again at Death’s doorstep, because his potassium had dipped dangerously low and his sodium had risen alarmingly high. As we were updosing the ANPs, the blood test results that informed us of this were delayed, delivered over three days after the blood had been drawn. We relied on a phlebotomist to perform daily home draws and next day results to properly monitor Neil’s blood levels.

Dr. Burzynski provided us with a prescription for a liquid potassium supplement. The only liquid potassium supplements available at the pharmacy were formulated with added sweeteners and colored orange with chemical dyes, ingredients known to promote cancer. This product was the only option available.

We kept detailed records of all the fluid going in – ANP infusions, Liquid Hope, potassium and water – and all the fluid going out. An indwelling Foley catheter steadily filled the urine bag hanging off the end of the bed frame and every time we emptied the bag we recorded the amount. We also tracked vital information with a pulse oximeter, a device that clips onto the finger and monitors blood oxygen saturation and pulse.

The visiting nurse in charge of Neil’s case, Gail from South County Hospital Health, was a dear friend dedicated to his care. Neil had grown up playing soccer with Gail’s son, Trey. Gail coordinated a wonderful team of home care specialists for Neil. Erin, the physical therapist had been helping Neil with balance and strength since September. Now she focused on maintaining the range of motion and circulation in his legs, and she showed me how to massage his feet and legs and manually rotate the joints of his ankles, knees and hips. Donna, Neil’s occupational therapist, had been helping with hand and arm coordination. Julia, a speech therapist, helped troubleshoot swallowing issues. Pam, the home health aide, came three days a week to spend an hour assisting Gail or us with Neil’s personal hygiene and bed sheet changes. And Jaymi, the alternate nurse filled in when Gail was unavailable.

Transporting Neil to MGH for neurological assessments was far too complicated, so we recruited a close friend, Dr. Achina Stein, DO, DFAPA, ABIHM, IFMCP, and her associate Sally Davidson, RN, MS, ANP-BC, IFMCP onto the team, as alternate sub-investigators. They graciously agreed to doing house calls and neurological assessments. Urologist Drew Tompkins was another valuable member of home care our team. We were truly blessed with the best home care support one could expect given the circumstances. This compassionate team of nurses, practitioners, aides and doctors took us under their wings and taught us an unbelievable amount in a relatively short span of time.

When not coordinating practitioner visits, I was moving constantly back and forth between the kitchen and the dining room – checking on Neil, monitoring apparatus and managing water, food, supplements and medicine. Moving in a clumsy hurry one day, I managed to pinch my left thumb as the door swung shut. The bruise that grew from the base of the thumbnail took the shape of a tiny wrench squeezing a tiny heart and producing a teeny drop of blood. My body seemed to be expressing outwardly the heart-wrenching feeling I was suppressing deep down within.

Neil could no longer walk nor dance nor sing nor talk. He could no longer eat nor drink nor grin nor laugh out loud. Yet, his heart was strong, his mind was sharp, and his eyes could speak. He was entirely present, he still had his sense of humor, and together we all called upon the Jester’s positive spirit to lift us up through the holiday season:

Whenever I feel like crying,

I smile hard instead!

I turn my smile upside down

and stand it on its head!

The rhyme is from The Jester Has Lost His Jingle, an uplifting children’s book by David Saltzman. Purchases support the Jester & Pharley Phund, which donates copies of the book and jester dolls to hospitalized children. The imaginary jester was Neil’s constant companion.

This post is an excerpt from Neil’s DIPG story, a work-in-progress. To put this chapter into context, this all happened in December 2016. Indomitable in spirit, Neil had survived six months beyond his three-month prognosis. I write this to raise awareness about the realities of pediatric brain cancer and to share what went on behind our family’s doors. While these words describe our experience at this stage in the progression of this disease, another family’s telling will differ greatly. I am interested in those stories, because they may hold valuable gems of information. The telling is always hard, and the memories difficult to revisit. For me, the writing process is strangely therapeutic, bringing with it a release of emotions.

I welcome editorial comments and reader reactions to this draft.

Evie hanging out with Neil

Writing for Advocacy

Dear Senator Reed,

We’re writing to ask your support for HRes 69, the National DIPG Awareness Resolution, in 2019, and to share our child’s brain cancer story. The resolution recognizes a day for educating the public about the importance of investing in pediatric cancer research through sharing the stories of DIPG families. These stories are important for promoting the search for safer, gentler, more effective solutions for treating brain tumors in children.

On March 4, 2016, we sat with our 19-year-old son, Neil, as he received a diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a rare inoperable form of brain cancer. He also received a prognosis of three months life expectancy… or six months, if he chose to undergo six weeks of radiation therapy, by which time, he was told, there may arise a hopeful solution. DIPG families have been listening to these same words for over 50 years, without any advancement in treatment. When Neil decided against radiation, we helped him research and develop a systemic whole body approach, combining alternative treatment strategies.

On June 4, Neil posted the following message on Facebook:

“Today is a bit of a strange day for me. It marks 3 months since being diagnosed with DIPG, the same time frame doctors originally gave me to live. According to the typical case, I shouldn’t be typing to you now.

“So why am I still here? Just some divine act of luck that decided to transcend science? No. There has definitely been some seriously divine luck, but science has not been transcended. Many things have come together to make this all happen as well as it has, but two deserve special note.

“Firstly, the importance of my mom’s understanding and applications of holistic health principles cannot be overstated. I never believed how important this dietary stuff was, but, it’s true, you really are what you eat, which makes me heaps of organic greens, consciously chosen meats, and precisely picked grains all knotted up with specialized supplements. Some may call this hogwash, but when you actually feel it help stabilize what’s considered one of the most malicious tumors, you tend to disagree.

“Secondly, this knot that’s all tied up about Burzynski needs to be let loose. When we first came down to Texas we obviously had no idea what kind of rats nest we were getting into with the FDA. My family and I took in the picture as given, weighing all probabilities, and decided this “renegade doctor” was worth the risk. A 30-year track record of anecdotal success paired with the fact that they were actually offering a clinical trial, something that requires enormous time and effort to put on, gave me more than enough confidence to give them a shot. Why waste their time and money on something they didn’t believe actually works?

“The FDA had to give the trial the green-light-go-ahead, which they did over a year ago. Then, suddenly, the day I began treatment, they decided to pull the plug from thin air, giving little more reason then “cuz we said so.” Thank God for a good judge who cared about human rights, or I might well just be another bug-on-a-rug.

“I have now been on treatment for a fairly significant portion of time and can confidently say it is helping. There is very real legitimacy to the claims of the Burzynski Clinic, and furthermore they have continued to show us nothing but the greatest human hospitality.

“Now, I continue to press on with these forces guiding my health. Only time will tell how I progress, but I approach tomorrow with faith. There are a lot of forces out of my control, but no matter what, I continually remind myself, I get to be alive here and now. I have found the present is a gift worth appreciating a little more.”

Later in June, we received a letter from from Vice President Joe Biden about the cancer moonshot project, which stated: “We will ensure that the patient community is heard, so that patients and their families are treated as partners in care and are given access to their own data and the opportunity to contribute to research.” It’s time for the patient community to be heard. DIPG families have many stories to tell. We all have knowledge, experience, data and heartache to share. Neil passed away February 19, 2017, and we want to assure that his death and suffering, and that of so many other children, was not in vain.

Please refer to the attached photos and the HRes 69 Senate packet, created by the DIPG Advocacy Group, and help us by leading the way to support HRes 69.

Sincerely,

Wendy & Dean Fachon

This is an example of writing for advocacy. Senators Reed (RI) and Rubio (FL) will be leading the way for HRes 69 in the U.S. Senate in 2019. Incidentally, this coming year marks the 50th anniversary of the first man’s first step onto the moon. That was Neil Armstrong. Incidentally, he lost his daughter, Muffy to DIPG in 1962.  And, incidentally, our son, Neil, was named for Neil Armstrong. We are inspired by coincidence and urge DIPG families and friends to call, write and visit their congressmen and senators to request support and share their stories. We are here to help people edit letters for impact. In fact, why not compile and publish these stories in a book to dedicated to advocacy and centered around the cause that has touched all our lives – finding a cure for cancer. The goal of this advocacy project is fifty stories,  representing DIPG families and friends in all fifty states. DIPG stories from outside the U.S. would be a welcome bonus, because we want to know what the experience is like in other countries. Please submit advocacy letters, which include a call to action, story and pictures, here. Limit to under 750 words, and make every word count.

To learn more about DIPG advocacy, listen to the December 13 podcast of Childhood Cancer Talk Radio, Every Voice Matters: The Power of Initiative in Advocacy.

April 18, 2016 – Neil, outpatient, after completing surgery for installation of arterial catheter.


December, 2016 – Neil’s first in-patient hospitalization, head shaved for emergency shunt surgery, after neuro-radiologist assigned to his clinical trial case neglected timely notification of hydrocephalus evident in November 15 MRI (shown here with math teacher, SLTP colleague and Patriots fan, Chris Boie).

Food for the Writer’s Soul

Writers are fed with their own life experiences and with the well-written books of other writers. Books are like appetizers, while experiences are the main course. This past month, friends and family recommended books of real substance, all of which I read ravenously. At night time, I’m rather like a doll, whose eyes close when placed in a reclining position. Once lying in bed, I’m seldom able to read beyond one page. Not so with these recent reads:

Grace and Grit: Spirituality and Healing in the Life and Death of Treya Killam Wilber by KenWilbur – compelling story about a couple’s struggle with cancer and their journey to spiritual healing,five-years through illness, treatment, and death.

Breaking Night: A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival, and My Journey from Homeless to Harvard by Elizabeth Murray – stunning memoir of a young woman, growing upwith parents who were drug addicts. She finds herself living on the streets of New York at the age of 15 after her mother died of AIDS. This is a wonderful book for teens about resilience.

 The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane: a Novel by Lisa See – powerful story about the destinies of a mother and daughter separated at birth. The baby is left near an orphanage, wrapped in a blanket with a tea cake in its folds. When Li-yan comes of age, she leaves her remote mountain tea-farming village for an education, a business and city life, while her daughter, Haley, is raised in California by loving adoptive parents.

Elephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II by Vicki Croken – remarkable true story of James Howard “Billy” Williams, a British adventurer, who entered into the teak trade, navigated the jungles of Burma in the company of elephants, became deeply attached to these highly intelligent animals and led them to help evacuees.

Bioregulatory Medicine: An Innovative Holistic Approach to Self-Healing by Thom, DDS, ND, Maffitt Odell, OMD, ND, L.Ac., Drobot, NMD, and Pleus, MD, DDS, OMFS and Higgins Kelley, MNT – comprehensive and evidence-based book about a holistic medical model that has been refined for over five thousand years by some of the brightest minds in medicine, science and philosophy.

What strikes me about all these books is the common themes of human experience, illness, resilience and spirituality – food for the soul. I picked up Bioregulatory Medicine this past Friday to prepare for a magazine interview and tour at Providence’s new BIOMED Center. The book was published two months ago, and I wish it had been available two years ago, when our son’s neurological symptoms were surfacing. I’m eager to learn more about the center’s leading-edge non-invasive diagnostics and their  natural and personalized approach to treating diseases like cancer. I may add a biomed chapter to my book and suggest this gentler approach for treating pediatric cancers.

Practiced in Europe, bioregulatory medicine is beginning to challenge the conventional allopathic approach to medicine currently prevailing in the U.S. Here’s a quote describing the difference between the two approaches:

“Western allopathic medicine relies on drugs that result in an opposite effect of the symptoms. From Greek roots, allopathic literally means ‘opposite of the disease.’ The model is based on using drugs that work against out biology to suppress disease symptoms. Here lies the distinction: Allopathic medicine treatments suppress biology while bioregulatory medicine supports it… the body’s natural ability to heal is profound and should be facilitated, not suppressed.”

In bioregulatory medicine, organic and whole foods support the body’s natural ability to heal, and the writer’s world, inspirational books support the mind’s ability to write.

One Voice in a Sea of Voices

     Neil’s young voice was one of many to speak out about DIPG Awareness and Childhood Cancer in general. This week a few more voices are striving to be heard in Washington, D.C. Three days ago, the DIPG advocacy group issued a press release. The header expresses a sense of urgency – A Moonshot for Kids: DIPG Awareness Resolution H.Res.69 Runs out of Time as Childhood Cancer Advocates Return to Capitol Hill. It continues:

     “Since the DIPG Awareness Resolution was first introduced in January of 2016, roughly 1200 more children have died of the deadly brain cancer while the bill has had no attention from House Leadership despite growing support nationwide. The DIPG Advocacy Group returns to fight for this bill which boldly confronts the lack of human values in the medical research industry.”

It concludes with the strong voice of a mother, Janet Demeter, who lost her child, Jack, age 4, to DIPG:

      “…it [DIPG] exemplifies in a powerful way the marginalization of childhood cancers and lack of funding for research. Every child’s life deserves hope, but there is none for these children with DIPG. The first iteration of this bill we used to call, ‘Moonshot for Kids.’ Most experts familiar with the disease agree that, if they could find the cure to this one, they might just find the cure to brain cancer. I know they can if science put a man on the moon 50 years ago.”

     To put this into perspective, according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), while about 3,560 children will be diagnosed with a brain or central nervous system (CNS) tumor this year, it is estimated that 16,830 adults (9,490 men and 7,340 women) will die from primary cancerous brain and CNS tumors. DIPG, one of the deadliest pediatric diseases with a dismal less-than-1% survival rate, has an average age of incidence between 5 and 9 years old. Diagnosed at age 19, Neil was even more of an outlier. He sat on the cusp of childhood and adulthood, just old enough to make his own bold decisions regarding treatment and to clearly articulate the experience of the disease. When DIPG robbed him of his ability to speak and to write about the experience, he spoke to us with his eyes, and this we documented with a few telling photographs.

     Stories show far more than statistics, and the sea of voices telling the stories intend to create a big wave. I can imagine Neil’s spirit, riding the crest with a whole bunch of younger souls, all destined to create a sea of change. That is the objective of my writing and sharing his story.


Words Matter

     Words matter. Through voice, we speak words to instantly transmit positive thoughts, encouragement, comfort, love and joy. Through writing, we use words to share valuable information, to describe transformative ideas and to compose inspiring stories. I write for Rhode Island NATURAL AWAKENINGS magazine, because the focus is upbeat – Healthy Living Healthy Planet – and my words go out to over 50,000 readers. More recently, I’ve been working on the story of our late son, Neil, who was, and still is, an enthusiastic and conscious communicator, taking care in choosing just the right words.

Neil, 19, resting in his Houston hotel room with his laptop, writing a petition to solicit support for his right to continue trying the experimental treatment of his choice. He is wearing a boonie hat and dog tags given to him by a friend who served in the Army Special Forces.
Neil composing words in the fight for his Right to Try

     “Neil had a unique voice, his own way of expressing his life experiences, character, thoughts and feelings. That was until a tumor started to grow inside his brain and gradually took away his ability to write and then his ability to speak. The name of the disease, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, is a strange string of uncommon vocabulary words. It is better known by its acronym, DIPG. Diffuse means the tumor is dispersed throughout the tissue, as opposed to being a solid tumor. Pontine refers to a part of the brain stem known as the pons, which relays messages between several areas of the brain and between the brain and the rest of the body. Without the pons, the brain would not be able to function, and neither would the body. Intrinsic means deep-seated. Each of these words means the tumor is inoperable. Glioma refers to the glial tissue that is supposed to support and protect the nerve cells, only in the case of DIPG, the glial cells grow out of control and strangle the nerve cell pathways. DIPG gradually takes away all physical abilities, except the ability to think. Throughout the progression of the disease, Neil remained conscious of everything that was happening, and somehow managed to accept it all with grace.

     “Do people realize how blessed they are to have a voice? Since Neil is no longer able to share his story, his thoughts about life and his dreams for the world, I’m here to do it. Things happened in Neil’s life that other kids need to know about in order to help make this world a better place. As Neil’s mom, I’m able to access a lot of material and will share as much as I can in Neil’s own words and the words of the friends, family, coaches and teachers who knew him best. Neil loved a good story, and if Neil’s story and his thoughts about life make people think, and think about their own stories differently, then I will have done my job well.”

     I welcome blog readers to engage and share the thoughts sparked by these words. Words are expressions of thought. Words and thoughts are influential. I dream of empowering more young people, like Neil, to share their ideas, stories and dreams for a better world. Read Neil’s story in the Boston Globe.


Word’s Worth

Etymology – the study of words. Pen – from Middle English, denoting a feather with a sharpened quill that can be dipped in ink for writing; derived from Latin penna, meaning ‘feather.’ When I was around 7 years old, our family traveled to Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. I remember my souvenirs, a white quill pen and ceramic ink well. Later I married a writer, who for the past 25 years has been my best friend and my teacher, sharing this crazy life and helping me hone my tools and my craft.

He is sitting at his desk, next to mine, and just asked me, out of the blue, where his Exacto penknife disappeared to. I have absolutely no idea!

He has a website, netscribe.com, and here’s a pointed piece he published there a few years ago, about bumper stickers and writing.

The feather, whence the pen

Was shaped that traced the lives of these good men,

Dropped from an angel’s wing.

~ William Wordsworth

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