How Can Plants Create Music?

How often do you receive appreciation, positive feedback and gratitude for something you’ve written?

This morning I received this message: “I’m blown away by your depth of understanding and your ability to translate that to others. Thank you again…from the bottom of my heart!” In researching the “Music of the the Plants,” I brought one of my own house plants along on the interview, to see if my plant would play me some music… and I was blown away! Below is the text of the article published on page 34 in the newest edition of RI Natural Awakenings magazine.

Plant Pioneers Human-Plant Relations Movement

Plant Pioneers are a group of plant lovers dedicated to raising awareness about plant consciousness and the inter-connected mutual relationships humans have with all living systems. This organization explores intelligent plant activity using an audio synthesizer that gives plants a voice, making their electrical frequencies audible to human ears through musical sounds. The audio interface is called “Music of the Plants.” Two wires from a pre-programmed synthesizer are connected to a plant, one onto the plant’s leaf, the other in the soil to complete the circuit. The synthesizer is similar to a biofeedback device and the sounds emitted by the synthesizer are generated by the plant’s own electrical impulses. Each impulse is assigned a specific musical note, and the harmonic tones are mesmerizing.

This process of human-plant communication was developed by an international community of scientists living in the Damanhur, a Federation of spiritual communities located in Italy. Damanhur has drawn the interest of scholars, educators and researchers in the fields of art, social sciences, spirituality, medicine and alternative health, economics and environmental sustainability. In addition to communicating with insects, plants appear to be responding to animals, humans and other environmental activities in ways that call for further investigation.

Bonnie Kavanagh, a second generation nurse and community herbalist with over 35 years experience in health care, is a local educator for Plant Pioneers. She is a graduate of the Rosemary Gladstar Art and Science of Herbology Apprenticeship and teaches herbal and gardening classes at 7 Arrows Farm in Attleboro, MA.

Field and woodland explorations awaken the instinctual nature that is part of the human genetic blueprint. This blueprint holds the key for understanding Nature’s subtle language. The sensory experiences of listening and feeling, taught by the “Music of the Plants,” enhance the sensory interactions traditionally associated with the study of herbs and healing – sight, touch, smell and taste. Observing Nature with all of the senses allows for the rediscovery of indigenous and ancient ways of interacting with the environment.

Plant Pioneers are showing people how to open their channels to listening, how to become a participant in Nature’s living landscape and how to do so with reciprocal dignity, integrity and respect. As stewards for the Earth’s whole system, Plant Pioneers are teaching people to treat plants and trees as sentient beings that have a rightful place in the grand scheme of the world. Plants have a lot to teach to humans. Kavanagh states this clearly, “Plants are the most benevolent of beings. We cannot survive without them and they require so little back from us. People, especially children (the future), need to be connected to the peace and healing that Nature offers.”

Join the movement. Sponsor a Plant Pioneer event at a farm, organization, school or home. Experience the Music of the Plants at 7 Arrows Farm. For more information on workshops and presentations, contact Bonnie at 508-399-7860 or kavnurse@hotmail.com. Learn more at http://www.plantpioneers.org.

Location: 346 Oakhill Avenue, Seekonk, MA

Article from page 34 of https://issuu.com/mcary/docs/2019-05_rina

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