Explore, Experience, Explain (Part 3)

The human body is like an electric battery; all of the cells within the body carry voltage, the electric charges necessary to maintain optimum health. The average human body is comprised of approximately 37.2 trillion cells! Within the cells are mitochondria, bacteria-like organelles which produce the energy that fuels the cells and regulates cellular metabolism. Aging, injury, nutritional deficiencies, toxic exposure and disease damage mitochondria, depleting energy, blocking energy flow and bringing on the decline of cellular health. Bioregulatory medicine uses a variety of evidence-based energy technologies to help repair cellular dysfunction.

I began exploring and experiencing some of these new therapies at the BioMed Center in Providence, in order to learn how they work and to better explain them to others. In Part 2 of this blog series, I explained the lymph system, shared a problem with lymph blockage (frozen shoulder), and presented some movement strategies to improve the flow of lymph. In this installment, I start to explore the added benefits of energy therapy.

Hemo-Sonic Lymph and Tissue Light therapy uses light, sound and biofeedback from the body to synchronize and improve blood and lymph circulation. Blood and lymph are fluids. Blood carries nutrients and oxygen to the cells, while lymph and blood carries metabolic waste away from the cells. Lymph contains infection-fighting white blood cells, which bathe the tissues and carry toxins out to the bloodstream to be eliminated from the body. When applied to the outer surface of the body, light emissions from the hand-held Hemo-Sonic device are translated into the sonic range of frequency. The device transmits its energy and information in the same way that dolphins communicate under water. The resulting vibrations assist human physiology at the most fundamental level, detoxifying the fluid mass of the body.

The therapeutic effects of this method promote normal fluid equilibrium, re-polarizing blood platelets responsible for transporting oxygen. This helps to maintain the aerobic state of energy production at the intracellular level. The therapy also destroys invading antigens and removes toxic chemicals and heavy metal contamination, and it optimizes a body’s immune function. Once detoxification is accomplished, the higher functions of the endocrine system can begin to heal tissue at a deeper level. Hemo-Sonic therapy is a gentle, highly effective detoxification therapy which is relaxing and supportive to the immune and endocrine systems.

In Part 4, we will explore Structural Energetic Therapy® (SET) is a head-to-toe bodywork treatment that addresses musculoskeletal problems with a combination of techniques.

Learn more about bioregulatory medicine. The BioMed Center is hosting an open house on Wednesday, March 20, 4:30-6pm at 111 Chestnut Street in Providence.

Explore, Experience, Explain (Part 2)

How might a dysfunctional lymph system effect the body? Can a lymph problem contribute to, say, frozen shoulder? And, if so, how? Doctors have differing opinions on what causes frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis). Some say sitting at a desk or laying down and resting the shoulder for long periods can aggravate an existing problem by limiting the use of the aggrieved shoulder.

Dr. Austin Oolo attributes the cause of frozen shoulder to a triad of physiological circumstances: a neck problem, a shoulder strain and a hormone imbalance.

Dr. Christiane Northrup suggests there may be emotional issues underlying shoulder issues, such as feeling one needs to carry the weight of the world upon one’s shoulders… or being too rigid in one’s thinking… or engaging in too much negative self-talk… or perhaps holding on to emotions of sadness which are associated with physical pain.

So what caused my left shoulder to freeze up?

Grief can be physically immobilizing, and I am certain grief was a key factor. In January 2018, less than one year after losing our son, age 20, to brain stem cancer, my shoulder began to stiffen. By May, the pain was so intense it kept me up at night. Had sadness and pain had come to settle deep within my tissues?

Considering my left shoulder, I recall sitting next to Neil, my left arm reaching around behind his back to support his weakening body, as he sat up to sip and swallow water, which he had to do often due to the high sodium content of his anti-neoplaston therapy infusions. Swallowing had become more difficult, as he was losing control of his muscles and mucous clogged his throat. We spent at least half an hour, every night, in the middle of the night, sitting together patiently on the edge of his bed, as he slowly sipped, spat, sipped and swallowed.

The cancer journey was full of unimaginable moments. First, the diagnosis (Wham!), and then the prognosis: He has three months to live (Bam!), followed by a year of intense battle. I buried the harshness of each and every heart-wrenching moment deep down inside, so that I could move forward, remaining strong and positive for Neil and the rest of the family. Had these suppressed memories and associated emotions become locked within?

Generally, frozen shoulder describes a pathological process in which the body forms adhesions of muscle fiber around the shoulder capsule, leading to restricted movement and pain. In the absence of movement, emotional and chemical toxins accumulate inside knots of scar tissue. While physical therapy (PT) and myofacial release massage therapy help to break down the scar tissue physically, recovery is a slow painful process. After seven months of daily PT and massage, I regained about 80 percent of my range of motion. Then I reached a plateau.

My residual pain and restriction compelled me to probe for a deeper understanding of my dysfunction, which is why I decided to undergo a full-body bioregulatory assessment at the new BioMed Center in Providence. In so doing, my open mind was exposed to new aspects of physical science, new non-invasive biofeedback therapies and new insights as to what was happening inside my body – physically, energetically and emotionally. The resulting information and associated possibilities astonish me.

Thermometry test results (explained in Part 1) indicated a lymph system blockage in my head and neck area. The primary role of lymph is to remove toxins from body tissues. While the heart automatically pumps blood through the cardiovascular system, the lymph system relies on body movement as a pump. It’s difficult to move lymph if body movement is restricted. I had never realized how important regular physical movement is for detoxing.

Among the BioMed doctors’ recommendations were movement therapy in the form of rebounding. Rebounding is a type of spring-leveraged low-impact exercise performed on a rebounder—sometimes called a “mini-trampoline.” The up-down movement of rebounding unblocks the lymph system and compels lymphatic fluid to flow and flush toxins. Rebounding is considered the most effective movement therapy for increasing lymph flow and draining toxins from the body. Basic rebounding movements include bouncing in place, jumping jacks, twists, side-to-side motions and running in place. Rebounding is fun, and gym trainers can guide people in doing rebounding safely and effectively.

For elderly people or people with restricted by balance or knee joint problems, rocking in a rocking chair is a good alternative. Children can move lymph by swinging on a swing, which requires pumping the arms and legs. My sister consciously jiggles to move her lymph and boost her mood. All of these simple and enjoyable activities activate the movement of lymph.

For patients looking to expedite the removal of a lymph blockage or for patients whose voluntary movement is restricted by a neurological disorder, the BioMed Center offers technologies which can assist in the process of moving lymph, expelling toxins and addressing emotional blockages and imbalances. More on this in Part 3.

Learn more about bioregulatory medicine. The BioMed Center is hosting an open house on Wednesday, February 13, 4:30-6pm at 111 Chestnut Street in Providence.

Explore, Experience, Explain (Part 1)

Some people write about their adventures, traveling across the icy Arctic, through the wild Amazon, over the boundless sea, or under. Today, I’ve decided to write about the vast unexplored terrain right inside my body. I prepared to navigate this uncharted territory by traveling only 15 miles from home, into the city of Providence, where I underwent a complete body health assessment and consultation, using state-of-the-art diagnostics.

As a writer for Rhode Island’s #1 healthy living magazine, I ‘m always finding there is so much more to explore, research, experience and explain with regards to well-being. After reading a book on bioregulatory medicine, touring Providence’s new BioMed Center and writing an article about both for RI’s Natural Awakenings magazine, I felt drawn to participate in this exploratory process. The process appears to be non-invasive, so why not be a guinea pig. I set up an appointment for January 2, filled out the requisite medical forms and followed through with the appointment.

What happened that day? A whole lot. Where do I begin? With a quick overview and the description of one of six tests. I’m analytical and I’m visual. I like to look at numbers and pictures, because they show me things. The graphic above shows a small sampling of the resulting data of energy signatures, which map the terrain inside my body. The data provides a glimpse of my AlfaVue Regulation Thermometry Report.

I tried to explain this test in my article with one sentence: “whole body regulation thermometry is an assessment that takes skin temperature readings at 119 points on the body, before and after stress, to assess circulation patterns and identify areas of vulnerability or dysregulation.” The stress part sounds a bit scary. In actuality, inducing stress had nothing to do with psychological battering or trotting on a treadmill. It was induced with exposure to a slightly colder temperature for ten minutes. I just stood there. The temperature readings were as quick as a when someone swipes a thermometer across the forehead. The resulting numbers and pictures are far more adequate than my one sentence in explaining thermometry, which was the first and most demanding of all the tests – simply stressful enough for the body to communicate relevant data, so doctors can see, interpret and explain the most significant findings.

What jumped out on this map of my body was a lymph system blockade (red bar on graph). This issue was confirmed by other types of tests administered that day. This is a symptom of being a passionate writer who will sit and spend hours absorbed in the work. According to Anne Lemons, “Prolonged sitting negatively impacts the lymphatic system as well as the heart, brain, and musculoskeletal system (1,2,3). If you sit most of the day for work, set a timer to get up every hour to take a short walk and move your lymph. As you may have heard it described, ‘sitting is the new smoking.'” Lymph vessels are activated by body movement; any activity that moves the arms, legs, and torso will help to move lymph.

The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs that help rid the body of toxins, waste and other unwanted materials. While there are numerous doctors trained to treat all the other body systems (neurologist (nervous), cardiologist (cardovascular), gastroenterologist (digestive), endocrinologist (glandular), a patient would be hard-pressed to find a lymphologist.

Understanding the critical role of the lymphatic system, the doctors at BioMed gave me a list of options for exploring and removing this blockade, many of which I can do myself, including dry skin brushing, rebounding for ten minutes per day at my health club, doing a detox regimen, taking a daily spore-based probiotic and adding a few herbal supplements. BioMed also offered me options to expedite the blockade removal process, including cranial/structural core distortion release (CSCDR), myofacial massage, hemosonic treatment and ozone therapy.

I plan to explore all of these options, one by one, to see which makes the most difference for me. I also plan to learn more about the lymph system and how it interacts with the other systems in my body. Once I get past the blockade, I can start to explore other areas of my internal terrain, because there is so much more to learn.

Read my recent article to learn more about bioregulatory medicine. The BioMed Center is hosting an open house on Wednesday, February 13, 4:30-6pm at 111 Chestnut Street in Providence.

Read what Anne Lemons recommends for lymphatic self-care.

Food for the Writer’s Soul

Writers are fed with their own life experiences and with the well-written books of other writers. Books are like appetizers, while experiences are the main course. This past month, friends and family recommended books of real substance, all of which I read ravenously. At night time, I’m rather like a doll, whose eyes close when placed in a reclining position. Once lying in bed, I’m seldom able to read beyond one page. Not so with these recent reads:

Grace and Grit: Spirituality and Healing in the Life and Death of Treya Killam Wilber by KenWilbur – compelling story about a couple’s struggle with cancer and their journey to spiritual healing,five-years through illness, treatment, and death.

Breaking Night: A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival, and My Journey from Homeless to Harvard by Elizabeth Murray – stunning memoir of a young woman, growing upwith parents who were drug addicts. She finds herself living on the streets of New York at the age of 15 after her mother died of AIDS. This is a wonderful book for teens about resilience.

 The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane: a Novel by Lisa See – powerful story about the destinies of a mother and daughter separated at birth. The baby is left near an orphanage, wrapped in a blanket with a tea cake in its folds. When Li-yan comes of age, she leaves her remote mountain tea-farming village for an education, a business and city life, while her daughter, Haley, is raised in California by loving adoptive parents.

Elephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II by Vicki Croken – remarkable true story of James Howard “Billy” Williams, a British adventurer, who entered into the teak trade, navigated the jungles of Burma in the company of elephants, became deeply attached to these highly intelligent animals and led them to help evacuees.

Bioregulatory Medicine: An Innovative Holistic Approach to Self-Healing by Thom, DDS, ND, Maffitt Odell, OMD, ND, L.Ac., Drobot, NMD, and Pleus, MD, DDS, OMFS and Higgins Kelley, MNT – comprehensive and evidence-based book about a holistic medical model that has been refined for over five thousand years by some of the brightest minds in medicine, science and philosophy.

What strikes me about all these books is the common themes of human experience, illness, resilience and spirituality – food for the soul. I picked up Bioregulatory Medicine this past Friday to prepare for a magazine interview and tour at Providence’s new BIOMED Center. The book was published two months ago, and I wish it had been available two years ago, when our son’s neurological symptoms were surfacing. I’m eager to learn more about the center’s leading-edge non-invasive diagnostics and their  natural and personalized approach to treating diseases like cancer. I may add a biomed chapter to my book and suggest this gentler approach for treating pediatric cancers.

Practiced in Europe, bioregulatory medicine is beginning to challenge the conventional allopathic approach to medicine currently prevailing in the U.S. Here’s a quote describing the difference between the two approaches:

“Western allopathic medicine relies on drugs that result in an opposite effect of the symptoms. From Greek roots, allopathic literally means ‘opposite of the disease.’ The model is based on using drugs that work against out biology to suppress disease symptoms. Here lies the distinction: Allopathic medicine treatments suppress biology while bioregulatory medicine supports it… the body’s natural ability to heal is profound and should be facilitated, not suppressed.”

In bioregulatory medicine, organic and whole foods support the body’s natural ability to heal, and the writer’s world, inspirational books support the mind’s ability to write.